Enid Blyton: The woman who made words come alive

Enid Blyton: The woman who made words come alive

Most of us have grown up reading Enid Blyton’s stories. From Noddy to Th Secret Seven, she had written many children’s books which made up our childhood. These stories were imaginative, fun, adventure-filled and exciting, and these stories helped Enid Blyton become immortal in the eyes of all those who read her stories.
Enid Blyton was born in 1897 in England. She was born to Thomas and Theresa Blyton, and she also had two brothers. However, her father soon abandoned the family in order to settle down with another woman, and many say that this is the reason as the why Enid Blyton always remained slightly immature. She was very good at the piano, but she trained herself to become a teacher, and she would write as a hobby. This is what led to her first work, a collection of poems titled as Child Whispers.
In 1924 she married Hugh Alexander Pollock and had two daughters with him. However, her marital life was far from smooth. The couple started falling apart, and Blyton tried to fill up the emotional void by having a series of affairs. The couple finally got divorced, although this did not have positive repercussions on her daughters. They were not allowed to see their father, and they started to dislike their mother because of this.
She remarried in 1943, and the man she tied the knot with, was Darrell Waters, and she moved in with him, along with her two daughters. However, he passed away in 1967, and she passed away in 1968. But throughout her eventful life, she continued to write hundreds of different kinds of stories for children. From fantastical ones, to adventure stories, she wrote various kinds of books for children of various ages. The Famous Five, with the four children and the dog, The Secret Seven, with the secret club and the adventures, the Noddy series, which was for little children, as well as various other series, framed and fired the imaginations of many generations of children.
A number of people criticized her for having very limited vocabulary, and for being very limited in imparting literary skills to the children who read her books. Many libraries banned her books for a while, and BBC also condemned her writing and her books. However, despite the criticism, one cannot dispute the fact that Enid Blyton is an essential part of the development of a child’s reading habit. Her books were so rich and descriptive, that every child would get hooked to the book, instead of considering reading to be a tedious job.
She also published a few books under the pseudonym of Mary Pollock, but its mostly the books which she wrote as Enid Blyton which are still revered by people who read these books as adults. Enid Blyton may have faced a lot of tribulations and a lot of criticism, but she still remains a defining force in how so many generations of children took to reading books. She did society a favor, the echoes of which will be heard for many, many years.

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