Join the police force: be the change!

Join the police force: be the change!

The fact that the police force is mainly dominated by men is no secret. It’s a worldwide phenomenon, which, for some strange reason, is not often rectified. The police force is a very intrinsic part of civil administration. For law and order to be imparted, the police force needs to do its duty to all the citizens of the particular place it is given charge of, but this is often not as fair as it seems.
The staggering male majority in the police force leads to patriarchal values and judgements seeping into a system which is supposed to be completely neutral and unbiased. Both men and women should be given the same amount of attention by the police, and people of all genders should feel unhesitant about approaching the police station. The point of the body in itself is to ensure that people are secure in the knowledge that they have the police to protect them. But this is not always the case.
There are various problems which women face when they approach a policeman or a police station. A woman is almost always subjected to a moral evaluation, which a man is exempt from. She might also feel hesitant about talking freely to a policeman, because of issues which might be too personal to be discussed freely. The solution to this problem is often debated on highly theoretical terms, but the solution to this is quite simple: more women should join the police force.
Law enforcement needs to be meted out equally to men and to women. Especially in India, the male-female ratio in the police force is quite shameful. About five percent of the police force comprises of women. This skewered ratio needs to be addressed in order to ensure a more egalitarian dispensing of protection. Crimes are not something which can be solved by men alone. And muscle-power is not the only thing required to prevent crimes from happening.
More women should start applying for the police force instead of complaining about the unfair policing in the country. Every problem has a practical solution, and complaining is merely the easy way out. Often, women are discouraged by their families and friends to join to police force, and they themselves consider the job to be too “gruelling” and taxing to be considered a serious option. However, women need to step up and take the baton in order to equalize justice for their own gender.
Women as policemen will not just help with the equal dispensing of protection and justice, it will also help women assert their importance in a field which was considered to be a “man’s world.” While young boys were taught to aspire to be policemen, women were taught to play with their kitchen-sets and dolls. However, women are the only ones who can change the current state of affairs.
Applying to the police force is the first step, but it is an important one. More women officers on field duty will also make men take them more seriously. The hand of the law is irrefutable, and cannot be ignored on account of its gender. Law and punishment are serious factors which might help dilute patriarchy, by giving women the chance to wield the proverbial axe of the written word. The more women officers there are, the more the chances are, that men (whether they be from the police force or outside it) will stand up and take notice, and they will learn to respect women a lot more as well.
So, it is the duty of a woman to stop complaining and for her to become the change instead of merely wishing for it. The presence of women is the most important aspect to dispensing fair treatment towards women, by the male-dominated police force.

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